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Congratulations to all the authors whose books have been shortlisted for the 2014 CBCA Awards.

Due to an error during a staff handover, Text Publishing’s entries for the 2014 Awards were not submitted.

Text sincerely apologises to the YA and Children’s authors we let down. We exist to serve our writers, and this mistake has caused our team great regret.

Kirsty Wilson, Sales and Marketing Director, Text Publishing

Today, Elsewhere


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‘Beneath the shiny surface of each sits both an abrasive wit and insightful reflection of human nature’: Nikki Lusk pairs Madeleine St John’s The Women in Black with Belle and Sebastian’s Dear Catastrophe Waitress.

Don’t blame millennials for new-adult fiction.

Are we entering a golden age of the second novel?

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Craig Sherborne’s second novel, Tree Palace, is ‘a novel as beautiful in its conjunctions as the chandelier swinging over its landscapes,’ writes Felicity Plunkett in the Australian. ‘Sherborne’s writing finds its grace in the odd and unexpected, and the rhythms of jagged lives…[his] talents with narrative and poetry combine to produce a striking fiction.’

Peter Craven in the Sydney Morning Herald calls Tree Palace ‘moving, terrifying and wonderfully well observed and, as with all the strange books Sherborne writes, a triumph…[it] is a brave, tremendously imaginative look at the familiar features of the human face in conditions we routinely despise and judge…a startling and blessed book.’

‘Sherborne pushes his characters to their limits, testing their mettle to create a family drama that is at once comic, tragic and unsettling,’ says Readings. ‘Sherborne’s descriptions of landscape are poetic and powerful, reinforcing a sense of identity that is deeply connected to a sense of place.’

‘Sherborne’s skills as a poet and playwright shine through,’ says Books+Publishing. ‘Tree Palace serves up a full slice of life—the bitter with the sweet.’

Eureka Street says ‘Sherborne had me at chapter one…Tree Palace is a reminder that even inside the smallest of stories there’s room enough for the stirring of universal themes…This is timeless, universal storytelling that is nonetheless quintessentially Australian.’

‘This is not a morality play,’ says the Hoopla. ‘[Tree Palace is] a delightful take on what it means to be family.’

Tree Palace is available now in bookshops and online.

#fridayfrivolity


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True Detective, if it were a series of Hardy Boys books.

I saw the best minds of my generation
Destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked
See me and hope I’m intoxicated or slightly faded
18 famous literary first lines perfectly paired with rap lyrics.

Book suggestions based on your favourite 90s album.

These are some beautiful photos of places you’ve only visited in novels.

30 bookish wedding readings.

“It’s really hard for me to trust people,” I said.
“Me too,” she said.
“Want to trust me, though?” I asked.
“Okay,” she said.
Just a normal, bestselling teen.

The 9 most mischievous literary pranksters.

Don’t even finish your novel.

Literary characters you should not invite to a dinner party.

And now I’m off to one of these bookshops that are also bars.

Today, Elsewhere


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‘Sherborne had me at chapter one. Yes this comes down to the writing, which is, quite simply, sublime, but it goes further than that…This is timeless, universal storytelling that is nonetheless quintessentially Australian.’ Craig Sherborne’s new novel, Tree Palace, reviewed at Eureka Street.

Life Is Short, Proust Is Long: on the pros and cons of speed-reading apps.

The case for profanity in print.

Today, Elsewhere


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‘She was my mask, my elsewhere, my alibi.’ Jay Griffiths on Frida Kahlo and what inspired her to write A Love Letter From a Stray Moon.

Isn’t everyone in a book club?

The real secret to making it as a writer is…

Today, Elsewhere


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Today, Elsewhere


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‘An immensely satisfying book, one that rewards slow and careful reading, it confirms his status as a writer of the highest caliber’: Murray Bail’s The Voyage reviewed in the New York Times.

Book editors do actually edit books, despite what you may have heard.

What is experimental writing?

#fridayfrivolity


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‘A delightful take on what it means to be family’: Craig Sherborne’s Tree Palace reviewed on the Hoopla.

‘Write what you know'—helpful advice or idle cliché?

Nobody tells you, “This is how to edit. Follow these steps.” A conversation with an editor about the behind-the-scenes work of publishing and why life is too short to read a bad book.