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‘It’s a book to catch, before it takes flight’: Jay Griffiths' A Love Letter from a Stray Moon reviewed in the Independent.

A history of love (of bookstores).

‘Dating a writer was one of my bigger relationship snafus—his ego often made our duo a trio.’ A survival guide to loving a writer.

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Listen to Marie Darrieussecq read from her novel All the Way and discuss her work on the Guardian books podcast (from around 9:00).

Which books from your past do you read now with ambivalence?

Junot Díaz’s great response to a high schooler who wrote to him after her school library threatened to ban his Pulitzer Prize–winning novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

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  1. Books are available all year ‘round.
  2. Books do not need to be toasted and smothered in butter to be enjoyable.
  3. Books will not make all your stuff sticky if you carry them around in your bag.
  4. Books are low-carb and sugar-free.
  5. Having more than one book is completely acceptable in polite company. (h/t to @nightlightguy)
  6. Someone else can enjoy a book after you’ve finished it.
  7. No-one gets hot under the collar when books appear in shops on Boxing Day. (h/t to @psephy)
  8. No-one ever learned anything of note from a hot cross bun.
  9. Books can still be fresh after hundreds of years. (h/t to @d_ncanb)
  10. A hot cross bun will only very rarely move you to tears.
  11. Books have won Pulitzer Prizes 100% of the time; hot cross buns, 0%.

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‘Well written, informative, lively, entertaining and often irreverent, Wright’s work is a seamless amalgam of academic text and storytelling worthy of a good novelist’: Clare Wright’s The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka reviewed at Bellaloopa.

How are these indie bookshops in New York City thriving?

What books make you feel stupid?

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Alex As Well is an awesome—and welcome—addition to LGBTQ YA featuring intersex characters.’ Alyssa Brugman’s novel reviewed at Once Upon a Bookcase.

Rewriting the history of FSG: Why is Farrar mostly left out of the Farrar, Straus and Giroux story?

Study finds that teens who read ‘banned’ books are more civically minded.

#fridayfrivolity


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The case for Henry Handel Richardson’s The Fortunes of Richard Mahony as one of the great Australian novels.

Related: can a single book sum up a nation?

A day in the life of the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

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‘Her brilliance isn’t limited to her mechanics, her finesse or her creativity as a writer, but it’s her willingness to continually address the psychological machinations of women who have very unfeminine feelings.’ Why Elena Ferrante’s The Story of a New Name should win the 2014 Best Translated Book Award.

‘Take it as a goddamn miracle if anyone cares what you have to say.’ 25 pieces of writing advice to end all writing advice.

The life of a ‘solidly mid-list’ writer: a cautionary tale/horror story/tiny beam of hope?

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Would you throw someone out of a lifeboat to save yourself? Eleanor Learmonth and Jenny Tabakoff’s No Mercy: True Stories of Disaster, Survival and Brutality poses the ultimate moral dilemma.

Literacy Is Knowledge: why reading comprehension is not a skill that you teach but a condition that you create.

What were the first books you felt you should read?

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A. J. Betts' Text Prize-winning YA novel, Zac & Mia, has been shortlisted for the Ethel Turner Prize for Young People’s Literature in the in the 2014 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards.

‘The voices of Zac and Mia are distinctive, real, raw, unsentimental, empathetic and completely believable,’ said the judges in their report.

The winners will be announced on 19 May.