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Let’s all play Murakami bingo!

We’re the only survivors. I haven’t eaten in a week. I’m starting to fade. I want to just put this idea out there and see what you think.
I think we should eat Grandpa.

25 great pieces of life advice from literature.

The top 10 books about hair.

The review that made Hemingway slap a critic in the face with a book.

‘I think we’re the only survivors,’ Tony said excitedly. ‘That would mean limitless potential for development of our own goals.’ Self-help authors stranded on a desert island.

10 words with difficult-to-remember meanings.

Quiz: Which siglum from Finnegans Wake are you?

Read this list of 25 authors who wrote great books before they turned 25 if you feel like torturing yourself today.

A floating library.

You know how they should settle this thing? Set up a cage fight between Grandinetti and Pietsch. Stage it at the New Yorker Festival. Have all the proceeds go the Authors Guild.

A Jewish literary map of New York City.

‘“How nice it is, having nothing to fear,” Blacktip said, and he was right. None of the rabbits ever died.’ Watership Up.

Book shimmy, ARC and other words book nerds need to know.

Today, Elsewhere


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Lisa Hill of ANZ LitLovers reviews Warning: The Story of Cyclone Tracy by Sophie Cunningham.

Shadow Influences: can you write like someone you’ve never read?

In hard times, we want complicated stories.

Today, Elsewhere


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‘Today, writing, for me, is above all a battle to avoid lying,’ she says. ‘If it seems to me not that I’ve won but that I’ve fought with all my strength, I decide to publish.’ A rare interview with Elena Ferrante in Vogue about her Neapolitan series of novels. Book three, Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, will be out on 24 September; books one and two—My Brilliant Friend and The Story of a New Name—are available now.

Can writing be taught?

Why we need independent bookshops now more than ever.

Today, Elsewhere


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Today, Elsewhere


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Text turns twenty this year! Jason Steger talks to our publisher, Michael Heyward, about this milestone.

Rebecca Mead in the New Yorker on the pleasure of reading to impress yourself.

Italo Calvino’s fourteen reasons to read the classics.

Today, Elsewhere


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In the great tradition of the novel, Harrower’s characters ask: ‘How are we to live?’ Susan Sheridan writes about In Certain Circles and Elizabeth Harrower’s work in the Sydney Review of Books.

Why is it so hard to catch your own typos?

Our Better Shelves: how indie bookshops give us hope that the Amazon annihilation is avoidable.

Today, Elsewhere


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The subject had always been with me but I didn’t feel I had permission to write it because it is about someone who can’t give consent to her story being told. Margaret Drabble at the Edinburgh International Book Festival on her latest novel, The Pure Gold Baby.

But the findings are, overall, much as any English teacher might expect: the first person does seem to encourage us to identify with the narrator, especially when that narrator is a lot like us.

The art of close writing.

Today, Elsewhere


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Clare Wright’s The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka has been shortlisted for the Australian History Prize in the 2014 NSW Premier’s History Awards.

Of The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka, the judges said:

This elegantly written and carefully researched study of the roles of women on the nineteenth century goldfields in general and in the Eureka uprising in particular changes and enhances our understanding of the contribution of women to Australian history. And in the process it draws an important conclusion, that Eureka had a feminist as well as a masculinist context. Wright recounts the hardships women encountered on their voyages to Australia, explores and explains their political views and activities, and demonstrates that far from simply acting as proponents of domesticity, women engaged in a wide range of entrepreneurial activities on the goldfields. And most importantly, in showing how they contributed to the Eureka uprising, Wright maps a goldfields culture in which women were not only present but also agents of social and political change.

You can see the full shortlists here. The winners will be announced at a presentation at the State Library of NSW on Friday 5 September 2014.

Today, Elsewhere


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Patricia Edgar, author of In Praise of Ageing, stands up for the ‘grey army’ in the Sydney Morning Herald.

Go home, grammar nazis.

What even is Australian English?